Transforming My Limiting Beliefs

by
Ann C. Schauber

fall-tree-gateIn the time before smart cell phones with Google voice directions, I was leaving my cousin’s house and had checked a map to figure out how to get to the interstate highway. Just as I was saying goodbye, my cousin’s husband volunteered to tell me “the easy short cut” to the interstate. I hadn’t asked him. He assured me that his way was better than the route I had figured out.

So I took his verbal suggestion and then got lost for over an hour. I was so angry with myself for not following the route I had mapped out. Why did I follow his way and not my own?

At that moment, I realized that I had been raised to believe that men knew more than women and that men were always right. As a woman, my role was to do as the man said. Even though I resisted these beliefs, I had nevertheless embodied them. As a grown woman, I had acted on that belief in spite of my own sense that what I had mapped out would have worked better for me.

TRANSFORMATION 1: I become aware that I have this limiting belief about men knowing more than women.

 

As a result of that experience and others like it, I have come to look more closely at my beliefs and how well they do or do not serve me. Once I am aware of the belief I have, I ask myself “Is this belief really true?”

In the belief about men knowing more than women, my resounding answer was “NO!”

TRANSFORMATION 2: I question if this belief is true and if it supports me.

 

Now that I was consciously aware of how limiting this belief was for me, I framed a re-do in my mind. In my replay, I thanked my cousin for giving me directions (He just wanted to be helpful.) and I took the route I had mapped out for myself. I saved myself an hour of anger and frustration. I stood in my own power. I believed in my own ability to find my way.

TRANSFORMATION 3: If the belief does not support me, I carry out a replay in my mind as a means of following my sense of what is right while still validating the other. This is mental practice that begins to retrain my brain to create a more empowering belief about myself.

 

Now, my opportunity is to stay alert to the next situation that brings up that limiting belief. I practice standing in my own sense of knowing, since that limiting belief no longer serves me.

This limiting belief slowly melts away as I practice awareness and a truer-to-self action. Now I watch for my next limiting belief. As I practice becoming aware and choosing the right empowering action for me, I feel freer, lighter, happier.

TRANSFORMATION 4: I watch for other beliefs and assumptions I may have about myself and others, questioning them before I take action. I ask, “Does this belief limit me or support me in being true to myself?”

 

Do you have any limiting beliefs that keep you from being who you truly are? In what situations do they show up? What might you do to consciously transform these beliefs so that you stay true to your self?

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